Category Archives: Comms 101

If you are preparing for a media interview, it is important to know how to get out of trouble. Here is your escape plan. Bridging is a tactic designed to move a conversation forward. It gets the listener to focus on the bigger picture.

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Media relations is the proving ground for most entry level PR new hires. As you advance in your career, you may begin to develop a specialty. Here are some of the career paths that may change the scope of your PR career.

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QR codes were almost extinct. For years, the only thing more hated than the QR code by marketing designers is the comic sans font. Is the Coronavirus helping QR codes make a comeback?

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Looking for a return on investment (ROI) for your proactive public relations? Think of your proactive placements as making deposits into a bank. I am not talking about a financial bank, but a trust bank.

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It’s been long known that advertising is all about reach + frequency. You have to reach the right audience multiple times. A “one-off” advertisement doesn’t work.

The same is true in public relations. Your key messages need to reach your target audiences multiple times from multiple sources in order to move the needle.

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Is civil and productive communication dead? Americans are more divided than ever. During a recent trip to Firehouse Subs, employees argued loudly about “respect” by commanding the attention of the entire restaurant.

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Yoda in Star Wars uses a rhetoric device called Anadiplosis. His explanation on how Fear is the path to the Darkside may help you become a better speech writer.

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Anaphora is a Greek rhetorical device to help you in your speech writing. The technique has been used in some of the greatest speeches in history. Perhaps, the most famous modern use of Anaphora is Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963.

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My first day in Speech Communications 101 was quite memorable. It taught us to think about the information that the audience will need to hear from your communication.

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I love this cartoon that I discovered on the internet. I wish that I knew the name of the artist. It perfectly illustrates the need to prioritize your communication messaging and think of the relevance to your target audience. We always want to say so much, but in doing so, we are saying nothing at all. In the PR Wars Podcast: What’s in it for me?, we discuss why someone would care about what you have to say. The podcast discusses reader benefit and the core motives of a listener. Core motives are three word sentences: “Make me money,” “Protect my family,” “Improve my health,” etc. Instead of just talking about ourselves, we need to keep the listener’s interests in mind when we create messaging for our companies. The PR Wars “Comms 101″ segment recognizes core communication principles to help you become a better communicator.

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